Those who care less about appearance or who are less attracted to shibari may go down the nylon route. Many may be satisfied with cotton. So if you’re going to use it, keep those EMT shears handy. (On the plus side, it’s not expensive to replace when you do cut it.). It’s not as fast as some synthetic ropes; because of the higher tooth, it will travel more slowly over skin and clothing. There’s also a greater likelihood of surface abrasion and friction burn if you move it really quickly or with great pressure. That’s right, it doesn’t degrade. It IMPROVES. Buy Rope! What are the pros and cons of different types of rope?

However, more importantly, this stuff is rated. It actually has a recommended load and a breaking strain on the label at Bunnings, which is where I got it. It also makes things more likely to be itchy, sneezy, etc. Update (2018). I was in an experimental mood, so I bought some and took it home with me. Wasn’t terribly expensive; maybe 15 dollars for a bundle?

If I’m not doing shibari, if I’m doing a quick restraint or column tie for sexual or other purposes with no care for the aesthetic, then this is my go to. Smooth, soft, fast, secure. Exactly what I need. So, to sum up the whole post:. Hemp Bondage Rope. Hemp is one of the natural fibre ropes that is commonly used for shibari. Sometimes even scars, if the rope is thin enough and the pressure is applied forcefully enough. I recommend rope of 5 millimeters or above for safety reasons.

So, to sum up the whole post:. At the moment, my two favourite ropes are the Twisted Monk Hemp for bedroom ties, and Tossa Jute for absolutely everything else. They’re both technically braided ropes; however the rope on the right seems to have a denser kind of braid, which means it doesn’t have the same issue with the knots compacting down as hard as the stuff from the 1-8 dollar shop. So, interesting learning from that one; denser braid makes for less difficult knots. Relatively easy to unpick. What you like will very likely not be what someone else likes. There are very popular ropes – but it’s really up to you to make up your own mind.

Likely to get quite compact knots with it. Very washable. It’s generally quite strong; you can usually put it under heavy load with minimal fear of stretch or breakage unless its obviously frayed. Goes well with the traditional shibari aesthetic; has that natural, organic kind of look. Hemp is one of the natural fibre ropes that is commonly used for shibari. It’s generally pricier than anything synthetic, and my understanding is that it’s used a lot over in the US. I had my Zen rope for quick synthetic ties, and I later moved on to focus on natural fibres. However, I snapped a couple of pictures of it while I was at Bunnings. The thinner it is, the more pressure will be concentrated on one spot, which leads to issues with circulation, nerve damage, general discomfort and bruising. Sometimes even scars, if the rope is thin enough and the pressure is applied forcefully enough.